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Vienna, VA


Vienna, VA

Vienna is a town in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, it had a population of 15,687. Significantly more people live in zip codes with the Vienna postal addresses (22180, 22181, and 22182) bordered approximately by Interstate 66 on the south, Interstate 495 on the east, Route 7 to the north, and Hunter Mill road.

In July 2005, CNN/Money and Money magazine ranked Vienna fourth on its list of the 100 best places to live in the United States. In addition to highly ranked public schools, its assets include a downtown with many small businesses, a Washington Metro station with large parking garages (the western terminus of the Orange Line) just south of the town, and a portion of the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park hiker/biker trail cutting through the center of the town. Tysons Corner is nearby, as is Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts.

Visitors will enjoy the hometown atmosphere of Maple Avenue (Rt. 123) bustling with specialty shops, numerous restaurants, family run businesses and stores. Take a stroll down treelined Historic Church Street, or take a leisurely drive through Vienna's Historic District, including Windover Avenue via Pleasant Street. Visit Freeman House and Museum, originally a residence / general store built in 1859, or walk across the street to Centennial Park, home to an old restored W&OD caboose and bordered by the scenic Washington and Old Dominion Regional Park Trail. There is something for everyone so...come visit, shop and stay for awhile. The Town of Vienna welcomes you.

The original Fairfax County Courthouse, built near the present Tysons Corner, likely marked the first European settlement in the Vienna area. Street names such as Old Courthouse Road and Lawyers Road still reflect that origin. Perhaps the first settler within the present town limits was Colonel Charles Broadwater, a prominent colonial soldier and public servant, who owned much of the land in the region and built his home here in 1754.

In the 1760´s John Hunter, a native of Ayr County in Scotland, married Col. Broadwater's daughter. Partly by marriage and partly by purchase, he succeeded Col. Broadwater as the area's principal landowner. It was John Hunter who built the first house of record within the town in 1767 and called it Ayr Hill after his native land. As the village grew, it assumed the name Ayr Hill, by which it was known for a hundred years.

Vienna in 1940 was still a small, quiet, rural town "population 1,237" virtually untouched by the metropolitan character of the nation's capital. The town began to take on a new look in the 1950´s when many businesses started to move from the old commercial section on Church Street to Maple Avenue. The post-World War II rush to the suburbs brought a burgeoning of population to Northern Virginia, almost 10,000 new residents to Vienna alone, their new houses blending with those of an earlier era.

In 1954, the first of Vienna's modern shopping centers was opened. More shopping centers followed in quick succession along a widened Maple Avenue in an attempt to keep up with the influx of newcomers who bought homes in the town's new subdivisions. Older residents recall with nostalgia the Victorian homes and the maple trees that lined Maple espite the many changes that have occurred since Vienna became a town over 100 years ago, it has retained a sense of pride in community, and its people have worked successfully to preserve many of the traditions and institutions that give us the feeling of living in our own "small town." Avenue before it was widened in 1958.
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Demographics

As of the 2010 census, there were 15,687 people, 5,528 households, and 4,215 families residing in the town. The population density was 3,565.2 per square mile (1,376.5/km²). There were 5,686 housing units at an average density of 1,292.3 per square mile (494.4/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 75.5% White, 12.1% Asian, 3.2% African American, 0.3% Native American, 5.3% from other races, and 3.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.0% of the population.

There were 5,528 households out of which 39.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.4% were married couples living together, 3.7% had a male householder with no wife present, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 18.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84, and the average family size was 3.19.

In the town, the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 24.7% from 25 to 44, 30.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.7 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.1 males age 18 and over.

As of 2009, the median income for a household in the town was $113,817, and the median income for a family was $124,895. Males had a median income of $88,355 versus $66,642 for females. The per capita income for the town was $49,544. About 3.7% of families and 5.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.
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Meadowlark Botanical Gardens

Meadowlark Botanical Gardens (100+ acres) are botanical gardens and an event venue located at 9750 Meadowlark Gardens Court, Vienna, Virginia, 22182. They are open daily except for major holidays and ice; an admission fee is charged. Photography is allowed when a proper reservation has been made, additional fees paid and pass issued. Details regarding photography access are available in writing only at the above address, and can not be described over the telephone or Internet.

The property is operated by the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority. A significant structure, the Atrium, is used as a wedding and event venue. The gardens aspect of the property features three ponds, two gazebos, an island bridge, more than twenty varieties of cherry trees, aquatic plants, an azalea collection, a fern and hosta collection, an herb garden, a lilac garden, and perennials. They also contain three native plant collections as part of the International Agenda for Botanic Gardens in Conservation:
  • Potomac Valley Collection - plants native to the Potomac River basin.
  • Virginia Native Tree Collection - native trees for use in a home setting, including Asimina triloba, Carpinus carolinana, Chionanthus virginicus, Magnolia virginiana, Ostrya virginiana, and Quercus lyrata.
  • Virginia Native Wetland - A small wetland with local trees including Betula nigra, Liquidambar styraciflua, Nyssa sylvatica, Platanus occidentalis, Salix nigra, Taxodium distichum; aquatic plants such as Acorus calamus, Nymphaea odorata, Pontederia cordata, Sagittaria latifolia; and shoreline plants including Carex spp., Cyperus spp., Equisetum hyemale, Iris versicolor, Lobelia cardinalis, Myrica pensylvanica, Sarracenia purpurea, and Typha latifolia.